The Modern Southern Gentleman...

Where tradition meets the 21st century

Posts tagged Texas

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Community Post: The SEC Burn Book

The Southeastern Conference (SEC) can be a scary place.

Being in the SEC during the regular season “is like being in Africa. By the watering hole. When the animals are in heat.”

And not everyone can handle it.

Welcome to the SEC.

Here, “You got your freshmen….

The University of Missouri

“Do they even go here?”

…ROTC guys…

Texas A&M University

“I don’t hate you because you’re cult-like. You’re cult-like because I hate you.”

…Preps…

The University of Mississippi (Ole Miss)

“We’re, like, really pretty.” “So you think we’re really pretty?”

…JV Jocks…

The University of Tennessee

“They asked me how to spell orange.”

…Asian Nerds…

Vanderbilt University

“If you’re from Nashville, why are you smart?”

…Cool Asians…

The University of Florida

“There’s a 30% chance we’re already losing.”

…Varsity Jocks…

The University of Georgia

“There are two types of evil people in this world. Those who go to Florida and those who go to Auburn.”

…Girls Who Eat Their Feelings…

The University of Arkansas

“And on the third day, God created the Remington bolt-action rifle, so that Man could fight the LSU Tigers. And the homosexuals.”

…Girls Who Don’t Eat Anything…

The University of South Carolina

“We only carry sizes one, three and five. You could try Belk.”

…Desperate Wannabees…

Mississippi State University

“Quit trying to make cowbell happen. IT’S NOT GOING TO HAPPEN.”

…Burnouts…

Auburn University

“That’s a scary mascot, bro.”

…Sexually Active Band Geeks…

The University of Kentucky

“Don’t have sex. You will get pregnant. And only be relevant in basketball.”

…The Greatest People You Will Ever Meet…

Louisiana State University

“Raise your hand if you’ve ever been personally victimized by Nick Saban.”

…And The Worst, Beware Of The Plastics.”

The University of Alabama

“On Wednesdays, we wear Houndstooth.”

At the end of the day, though, we come together to judge the other conferences.

We’re the best, and we’re sorry you’re all jealous.

Keep trying, though.

We’ll still be here.

Taken from BuzzFeed, but it was too funny not to post it all out to make sure y’all saw it! 

Filed under SEC Southeastern Conference College Sports The South The SEC Mean Girls Missouri University of Missouri Mizzou Texas A&M University Texas A&M University of Mississippi Ole Miss Mississippi Texas University of Tennessee Tennessee Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt Vandy University of Florida Florida University of Georgia Georgia University of Arkansas Arkansas University of South Carolina South Carolina Mississippi State University Mississippi State

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Federal judge strikes down Texas marriage ban, stays ruling pending appeal | Freedom to Marry

Way to go, Texas!!! Definitely excited to see this out of a Southern state!!! Even if the whole state isn’t Southern! This is great!!! 

Filed under Texas The South Marriage Equality LGBTQ Gay Marriage Marriage Wedding Weddings Same-Sex Marriage

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cloakstone69:

president-vanellope:

wake up america

this is to educate my non-American followers. This really is how the US sees itself. (and yes, 95% of the time, Florida = WHAT?!)

My only real critique of this is that West and North Texas aren’t really Southern, they’re Southwestern. And neither is West Virginia. The whole reason it exists is because they identified with the North during the American Civil War.

(via vieux-yeux)

Filed under Map Maps Region Regionalism American Civil War Texas West Virginia

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Univ. of Texas swimmer Matt Korman comes out to teammates in email

It’s always nice to see people building up and supporting their teammates, especially when it’s not always expected. Congrats, Matt! 

Filed under Texas University of Texas Texas Longhorns Texas Swimming Swimming Swimmer Athlete Athletes OutSports LGBTQ Athlete LGBTQ Athletes The South LGBTQ in the South Gay College

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The South Seems to be Going Crazy Right Now

And I’ve been a little overwhelmed by life in general, so I’ve kinda just had to sit back with my jaw hanging open.  From Texas and North Carolina pretty well trying to ban abortion (something even Mississippi couldn’t accomplish), Rick Perry vetoing a bill that passed the Texas House of Representatives unanimously that would have required the state to buy US made goods when they were comparable in price and quality to foreign-made goods, and some crazy Louisianans trying to ban the flying of Gay Pride flags, the South is aflame with bigotry, oppression, and just plain stupidity much more visibly and widespread than the norm.  

But Tennessee just couldn’t stay out of it.  Gotta throw our name in the crazy hat, too. Thankfully, it’s not a politician this time, just a former lawyer.  He’s suing Apple for, get this, being able to access and view porn on his Apple devices.  You can’t make this stuff up, lol.  All because of a typo when he tried to go fo Facebook.com and ended up at Fuckbook.com.  He says it led to an “unwanted sex addiction.”  So it’s Apple’s fault that you can’t type or keep it in your pants?  I just don’t get how a former lawyer thinks this is a legitimate claim.  

Honestly, I think it’s a publicity stunt.  When I googled the guy, assuming he was a politician I’d never heard of, a Facebook page comes up that appears to be a “band page” with all of 77 “Likes” at the time of this writing. 

Filed under The South Texas North Carolina Louisiana Tennessee Reproductive Rights LGBTQ Apple Stupid People

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A Hail Mary at Texas A&M University

I’ve been so wrapped up in regular school stuff, work, and all the Sex Week stuff here at The University of Tennessee that I haven’t had a chance to talk about something that one of our sister SEC schools started and has now escalated. 

Like a lot of campuses now, Texas A&M University has a GLBT Resource Center and the Student Government Association at TAMU has taken a major step toward “indirect discrimination.”  I say indirect because, even though this bill was aimed squarely at the GLBT Resource Center, the current wording says that students can “opt-out” of a certain portion of their student activities fees if a particular activity offends their religious sensibilities.  

The SGA approved the measure 35-28 and it didn’t look good.  But, as I was researching a little bit for this blog, I saw a new article pop up yesterday stating that Student Body President John Claybrook vetoed the measure.   He stated in an open letter that even the discussion of this bill “has caused great harm to our reputation as a student body and to the students feeling disenfranchised by this bill.

TAMU already has a poor reputation when it comes to LGBT inclusiveness.  It was rated the least LGBT friendly school in Texas and the 7th least friendly of public institutions in the country by The Princeton Review in 2012. It is heartening that such a traditionally conservative school was split 55%/45% on an issue like this and it’s even better that the Student Body President stood up and said no.  But the fact that it ever made it this far is insane.  

I’m aware the The University of Tennessee doesn’t have the best track record when it comes to gender or sexual orientation issues, but I feel pretty comfortable saying that a measure of this nature would be smacked down before it ever even got any local attention.  I guess all’s well that ends well, but the fact that people out there think this way in these numbers really saddens me. 

Filed under Texas A&M University Texas A&M TAMU Texas The South LGBTQ LGBT LGBTQ in the South SEC Southeastern Conference

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I recently made a trip back home to Memphis, with pit stops in Sikeston, MO to see my maternal grandparents and Potts Camp, MS to visit my daddy’s side of the family.  When I travel, I think a lot about the South, what it was, what it is, where it’s headed.  But it seems like there there isn’t always a consensus about what is Southern and what isn’t.  My grandparents in Sikeston, for example, have a few Southern tendencies, but don’t really consider themselves Southern, but both of their children do/did.  
Momma moved to Memphis in 1976 to attend nursing school and most definitely has always considered herself a Southern woman.  Her brother stayed in the Bootheel, but he and his kids all consider themselves Southern.  And my mother and I have always accepted that as fact.  After all, Southeast MO is a cultural transition area where the South meets the Midwest.  That part of the sate often even pronounces their homeland as “Missourah” instead of the traditional “Missouree,” definitely a Southern speech pattern. 
My grandparents tell me almost every time I see them that I “don’t sound like [I’m] from Memphis.”  It used to somewhat offend me, but I’ve realized why they think this way: I speak quickly.  The idea that all Southerners speak slowly is not only antiquated, it’s very inaccurate.  Sure, there are plenty of Southerners that still speak like that, but it’s not really the norm anymore.  So many of us are from large cities and speaking slowly just doesn’t generally cut it there.  Doesn’t mean we’ve lost our accent or manners, just that we have just as much to say, but less time to do so.  
But Southern culture isn’t one giant homogenous thing.  We share common elements, the fact that we drawl our words, but even the way we do that varies.  Carolina Lowcountry isn’t West Tennessee cotton culture.  So, I decided to make this map.  I know that even this is somewhat of a generalization, but feel like it’s pretty accurate.  I’m always open to suggestions if anyone has them.  And obviously these different areas aren’t exclusive; cultures bleed and blend.  Southern Appalachia is most definitely Southern, but it’s different than central Georgia’s culture. Also, the Deep South is generally listed as MS, AL, and GA. But Southeast AR, North LA and SC definitely constitute Deep South as well.  I’ve included the very Southwest corner of TN, namely Memphis and up to around the Covington, TN area.  The reason for this is that we are part of the Mississippi River Delta and Delta culture is most definitely Deep South. 
Do note “New South” doesn’t strictly denote the idea that these areas haven’t always been considered the South, rather that they are now the outermost border of what is thought of as the South by most people today.
Our culture constantly grows, shifts, and evolves, yet maintains our Southern charms and sensibilities.  The South is our home and here’s to keeping it that way! 

I recently made a trip back home to Memphis, with pit stops in Sikeston, MO to see my maternal grandparents and Potts Camp, MS to visit my daddy’s side of the family.  When I travel, I think a lot about the South, what it was, what it is, where it’s headed.  But it seems like there there isn’t always a consensus about what is Southern and what isn’t.  My grandparents in Sikeston, for example, have a few Southern tendencies, but don’t really consider themselves Southern, but both of their children do/did.  

Momma moved to Memphis in 1976 to attend nursing school and most definitely has always considered herself a Southern woman.  Her brother stayed in the Bootheel, but he and his kids all consider themselves Southern.  And my mother and I have always accepted that as fact.  After all, Southeast MO is a cultural transition area where the South meets the Midwest.  That part of the sate often even pronounces their homeland as “Missourah” instead of the traditional “Missouree,” definitely a Southern speech pattern. 

My grandparents tell me almost every time I see them that I “don’t sound like [I’m] from Memphis.”  It used to somewhat offend me, but I’ve realized why they think this way: I speak quickly.  The idea that all Southerners speak slowly is not only antiquated, it’s very inaccurate.  Sure, there are plenty of Southerners that still speak like that, but it’s not really the norm anymore.  So many of us are from large cities and speaking slowly just doesn’t generally cut it there.  Doesn’t mean we’ve lost our accent or manners, just that we have just as much to say, but less time to do so.  

But Southern culture isn’t one giant homogenous thing.  We share common elements, the fact that we drawl our words, but even the way we do that varies.  Carolina Lowcountry isn’t West Tennessee cotton culture.  So, I decided to make this map.  I know that even this is somewhat of a generalization, but feel like it’s pretty accurate.  I’m always open to suggestions if anyone has them.  And obviously these different areas aren’t exclusive; cultures bleed and blend.  Southern Appalachia is most definitely Southern, but it’s different than central Georgia’s culture. Also, the Deep South is generally listed as MS, AL, and GA. But Southeast AR, North LA and SC definitely constitute Deep South as well.  I’ve included the very Southwest corner of TN, namely Memphis and up to around the Covington, TN area.  The reason for this is that we are part of the Mississippi River Delta and Delta culture is most definitely Deep South. 

Do note “New South” doesn’t strictly denote the idea that these areas haven’t always been considered the South, rather that they are now the outermost border of what is thought of as the South by most people today.

Our culture constantly grows, shifts, and evolves, yet maintains our Southern charms and sensibilities.  The South is our home and here’s to keeping it that way! 

Filed under Memphis Tennessee The South Potts Camp Mississippi Sikeston Missouri Alabama Georgia South Carolina North Carolina Virginia Maryland Deleware West Virginia Kentucky Arkansas Texas Louisiana Florida Deep South Map Maps

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Self Evident Truths is a project I heard about a long time ago and, honestly, figured would fizzle out.  It didn’t.  I learned today that they are actually headed out on a tour of the South! 

NYC based photographer, iO Tillet Wright, began this project in 2010, photographing a few hundred people in NYC.  But the project has grown! And, as Southerners, our faces need to be seen and our voices heard.  So often, we are left out of the conversation on LGBTQ rights all together.  People assume we grow up and move away; we try to escape the South.  We need to show them that we are here and happy! After all, if we all left, this place would never change.  I encourage everyone that has the possibility to do so to turn out and have your photo taken.  

Here is a list of the cities they will be in and when: 

Oklahoma City, OK February 24 & 25

Dallas, TX
February 26

Little Rock, AR
February 27

Jackson, MS
February 28

New Orleans, LA
March 1 & 2

Mobile, LA
March 3

Birmingham, AL
March 4

Atlanta, GA
March 6 & 7

Athens, GA
March 8

Asheville, NC
March 9

Knoxville, TN
March 11 & 12

Filed under LGBTQ LGBT Gay The South Knoxville Tennessee Atlanta Athens Georgia Dallas Texas Jackson Mississippi New Orleans NOLA Louisiana Mobile Birmingham Alabama Asheville North Carolina Oklahoma Oklahoma City OKC