The Modern Southern Gentleman...

Where tradition meets the 21st century

Posts tagged South Carolina

3 notes

Need for National and State Workplace Non-Discrimination Protections Grows More Obvious

This is part of a conversation recorded of the Mayor who fired the police chief: 

I would much rather have.. and I will say this to anybody’s face… somebody who drank and drank too much taking care of my child than I had somebody whose lifestyle is questionable around children.

Because that ain’t the damn way it’s supposed to be. You know…you  got people out there — I’m telling you buddy — I don’t agree with some of the lifestyles that I see portrayed and I don’t say anything because that is the way they want to live, but I am not going to let my child be around.

I’m not going to let two women stand up there and hold hands and let my child be aware of it. And I’m not going to see them do it with two men neither.”

I’m not going to do it. Because that ain’t the way the world works.

Now, all these people showering down and saying ‘Oh it’s a different lifestyle they can have it.’ Ok, fine and dandy, but I don’t have to look at it and I don’t want my child around it.

It is time for federal protection!!! 

Filed under The South LGBTQ South Carolina Homophobia Discrimination Bigotry LGBTQ in the South

2 notes

COLUMBIA, SC: USC Upstate facing more cuts over gay-themed programming | Politics | The State

southerngamerguy:

I genuinely hate SC republicans from the Upstate.  The rest of the state, not AS terrible.

We feel your pain here at the University of Tennessee after the state legislature vowed to slash finding because we dared to talk about sex.

Filed under LGBTQ LGBTQ in the South South Carolina University of South Carolina University of South Carolina Upstate College of Charleston Bigotry Sex Week University of Tennessee

1,647 notes

Lesbian Black Latina Vying for Miss South Carolina Crown

fyqueerlatinxs:

image

It’s some kind of miracle how comfortable Analouisa Valencia — a lesbian African-American/Latina beauty queen — is in her skin. Currently Miss Lyman, S.C., Valencia travels to the state capitol in July to compete in the Miss South Carolina contest and, hopefully, advance to the Miss America pageant. Valencia isn’t coming out per se, because the 19-year-old college student has been out for years; she took her girlfriend, Tamyra Bell, to her prom and attended Bell’s. But Valencia is ready to tell the world her story and remains optimistic the judges in Columbia will see her like so many already do: as a role model. The teen was candid in a recent interview with The Advocate, talking excitedly about her future and the women who inspire her.

The Advocate: How did you get involved in beauty pageants?
Analouisa Valencia: I’m from Spartanburg, S.C. and I started pageantry when I was Miss South Carolina Princess for Miss Spartanburg 2000. After that, I decided I wanted to be in pageants when I got older. So, when I got old enough I started to compete.

When did you come out?
In ninth-grade.

Oh, wow. And you went to public school in South Carolina?
I did.

How was that received?
My teachers were ok with it. My mom at first said, “Well, I don’t support it, but I love you so I’ll support you.” She’s ok with it now, but it’s been a couple of years. My dad at first was very, very, very furious. I think it took him a good three weeks to finally accept the fact that I was just going to be who I was and be proud of it. My teachers were very supportive.

How would you describe the pageant circuit in South Carolina? Is it welcoming to LGBT people?
Well, I had one question during an interview that was, How would you feel about having a lesbian Miss South Carolina? I said, “I don’t think her sexuality has anything to do with it. It doesn’t define her as a person, because she’s still going to be a good human being.” Miss South Carolina should be a great role model, but her sexual orientation shouldn’t define her as a person. And it shouldn’t define her getting a crown. I do have friends in the pageant circuit that are accepting of gay people and I find that it has given me a lot of support and a lot of extra push.

Since you came out, do things feel different in South Carolina? Do they feel more welcoming?
In certain parts it’s a little bit more welcoming. There are certain organizations and certain people and certain areas that aren’t so welcoming of [gay people], so I guess we’re still getting there. Very slowly but surely.

Do you think people can’t reconcile a beauty queen with the word “lesbian”?
That is kind of true, but at the same time I’m not thinking about that so much because I have people who are supportive. But I think it does play a part, a small part in me not having hadn’t won in local pageants because some judges knew.

[continue reading]

Filed under LGBTQ LGBTQ in the South The South South Carolina Miss South Carolina Latina Latin@

2 notes

Today was a great day in SEC football.

Tennessee beat South Carolina.
Mizzou beat Florida.
Vanderbilt beat Georgia.
Auburn beat Texas A&M.
Ole Miss beat LSU.
My only upset is that Alabama beat Arkansas. No offense, y’all; I hate both teams, lol. Memphis born, Tennessee educated, what can I say.

But a day of upsets means that teams are growing and changing. The top teams have gotten lazy and the newer teams are getting better. It may be a so-so year for the SEC as a whole, but I think it’ll lead to a stronger conference in the long run.

Filed under Tennessee University of Tennessee South Carolina University of South Carolina Mizzou University of Missouri Florida University of Florida Vanderbilt Vandy Vanderbilt University Georgia University of Georgia UGA USC Auburn Auburn University Texas A & M Texas A & M University TAMU Ole Miss University of Mississippi Mississippi Louisiana State University LSU Louisiana Texas Alabama Missouri University of Alabama

10 notes

I recently made a trip back home to Memphis, with pit stops in Sikeston, MO to see my maternal grandparents and Potts Camp, MS to visit my daddy’s side of the family.  When I travel, I think a lot about the South, what it was, what it is, where it’s headed.  But it seems like there there isn’t always a consensus about what is Southern and what isn’t.  My grandparents in Sikeston, for example, have a few Southern tendencies, but don’t really consider themselves Southern, but both of their children do/did.  
Momma moved to Memphis in 1976 to attend nursing school and most definitely has always considered herself a Southern woman.  Her brother stayed in the Bootheel, but he and his kids all consider themselves Southern.  And my mother and I have always accepted that as fact.  After all, Southeast MO is a cultural transition area where the South meets the Midwest.  That part of the sate often even pronounces their homeland as “Missourah” instead of the traditional “Missouree,” definitely a Southern speech pattern. 
My grandparents tell me almost every time I see them that I “don’t sound like [I’m] from Memphis.”  It used to somewhat offend me, but I’ve realized why they think this way: I speak quickly.  The idea that all Southerners speak slowly is not only antiquated, it’s very inaccurate.  Sure, there are plenty of Southerners that still speak like that, but it’s not really the norm anymore.  So many of us are from large cities and speaking slowly just doesn’t generally cut it there.  Doesn’t mean we’ve lost our accent or manners, just that we have just as much to say, but less time to do so.  
But Southern culture isn’t one giant homogenous thing.  We share common elements, the fact that we drawl our words, but even the way we do that varies.  Carolina Lowcountry isn’t West Tennessee cotton culture.  So, I decided to make this map.  I know that even this is somewhat of a generalization, but feel like it’s pretty accurate.  I’m always open to suggestions if anyone has them.  And obviously these different areas aren’t exclusive; cultures bleed and blend.  Southern Appalachia is most definitely Southern, but it’s different than central Georgia’s culture. Also, the Deep South is generally listed as MS, AL, and GA. But Southeast AR, North LA and SC definitely constitute Deep South as well.  I’ve included the very Southwest corner of TN, namely Memphis and up to around the Covington, TN area.  The reason for this is that we are part of the Mississippi River Delta and Delta culture is most definitely Deep South. 
Do note “New South” doesn’t strictly denote the idea that these areas haven’t always been considered the South, rather that they are now the outermost border of what is thought of as the South by most people today.
Our culture constantly grows, shifts, and evolves, yet maintains our Southern charms and sensibilities.  The South is our home and here’s to keeping it that way! 

I recently made a trip back home to Memphis, with pit stops in Sikeston, MO to see my maternal grandparents and Potts Camp, MS to visit my daddy’s side of the family.  When I travel, I think a lot about the South, what it was, what it is, where it’s headed.  But it seems like there there isn’t always a consensus about what is Southern and what isn’t.  My grandparents in Sikeston, for example, have a few Southern tendencies, but don’t really consider themselves Southern, but both of their children do/did.  

Momma moved to Memphis in 1976 to attend nursing school and most definitely has always considered herself a Southern woman.  Her brother stayed in the Bootheel, but he and his kids all consider themselves Southern.  And my mother and I have always accepted that as fact.  After all, Southeast MO is a cultural transition area where the South meets the Midwest.  That part of the sate often even pronounces their homeland as “Missourah” instead of the traditional “Missouree,” definitely a Southern speech pattern. 

My grandparents tell me almost every time I see them that I “don’t sound like [I’m] from Memphis.”  It used to somewhat offend me, but I’ve realized why they think this way: I speak quickly.  The idea that all Southerners speak slowly is not only antiquated, it’s very inaccurate.  Sure, there are plenty of Southerners that still speak like that, but it’s not really the norm anymore.  So many of us are from large cities and speaking slowly just doesn’t generally cut it there.  Doesn’t mean we’ve lost our accent or manners, just that we have just as much to say, but less time to do so.  

But Southern culture isn’t one giant homogenous thing.  We share common elements, the fact that we drawl our words, but even the way we do that varies.  Carolina Lowcountry isn’t West Tennessee cotton culture.  So, I decided to make this map.  I know that even this is somewhat of a generalization, but feel like it’s pretty accurate.  I’m always open to suggestions if anyone has them.  And obviously these different areas aren’t exclusive; cultures bleed and blend.  Southern Appalachia is most definitely Southern, but it’s different than central Georgia’s culture. Also, the Deep South is generally listed as MS, AL, and GA. But Southeast AR, North LA and SC definitely constitute Deep South as well.  I’ve included the very Southwest corner of TN, namely Memphis and up to around the Covington, TN area.  The reason for this is that we are part of the Mississippi River Delta and Delta culture is most definitely Deep South. 

Do note “New South” doesn’t strictly denote the idea that these areas haven’t always been considered the South, rather that they are now the outermost border of what is thought of as the South by most people today.

Our culture constantly grows, shifts, and evolves, yet maintains our Southern charms and sensibilities.  The South is our home and here’s to keeping it that way! 

Filed under Memphis Tennessee The South Potts Camp Mississippi Sikeston Missouri Alabama Georgia South Carolina North Carolina Virginia Maryland Deleware West Virginia Kentucky Arkansas Texas Louisiana Florida Deep South Map Maps

20 notes

emptyvalleyofmyheart:

This is from the Palmetto State Facebook.
If you are from South Carolina, you know how fucking true this is. Hell. If you’ve even BEEN here, you know what this is.

Minus that one obviously racial remark, I’d have to say this is pretty true form the time I’ve spent in South Carolina. 

emptyvalleyofmyheart:

This is from the Palmetto State Facebook.

If you are from South Carolina, you know how fucking true this is. Hell. If you’ve even BEEN here, you know what this is.

Minus that one obviously racial remark, I’d have to say this is pretty true form the time I’ve spent in South Carolina. 

Filed under South Carolina The South