The Modern Southern Gentleman

Where tradition meets the 21st century

Posts tagged South Carolina

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First same sex marriage license to be granted in Charleston County

This is amazing!!! Also, be prepared for a flood of articles and posts on this topic over the next few days. 

Filed under Charleston South Carolina Marriage Equality The South LGBTQ LGBTQ in the South

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The silver lining of SCOTUS not taking up any of the marriage equality cases is that it leaves the lower courts rulings intact, meaning that marriage equality is coming to 5 more states, potentially 2 of them in the South (including southeastern OK is pretty Southern - WV, however, by its founding, is not Southern)!!! This will bring the total to 24 states plus DC (30 if you include other states in the same districts as states that filed cases like the examples above)!!! It’s comin, y’all!

The silver lining of SCOTUS not taking up any of the marriage equality cases is that it leaves the lower courts rulings intact, meaning that marriage equality is coming to 5 more states, potentially 2 of them in the South (including southeastern OK is pretty Southern - WV, however, by its founding, is not Southern)!!! This will bring the total to 24 states plus DC (30 if you include other states in the same districts as states that filed cases like the examples above)!!! It’s comin, y’all!

Filed under Marriage Equality The South South Carolina North Carolina Virginia LGBTQ LGBTQ in the South Southerners for the Freedom to Marry

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The 'Most Dangerous' States In America

And guess how many Southern states are on the list?  Guess.







4.  Four.  Quatro.  Quatre. Четыре. Frya.  Nne. 四. Need I go on?  

And if you count states that were once considered Southern, we’re up to 5.  That’s pathetic, y’all.   

Filed under The South Crime South Carolina Tennessee Florida Louisana Maryland

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lifeinmyrtlebeach:

Surfside Beach, SC

This is so random, but there’s this little place in Surfside called River City Café and they make the BEST homemade Ranch dressing my friends and I have ever had.  We seriously compare all Ranch dressings to the one we had there once, totally randomly on vacation.  And we ate on the deck overlooking the Ocean on a warm October day.  It was perfect.  

lifeinmyrtlebeach:

Surfside Beach, SC

This is so random, but there’s this little place in Surfside called River City Café and they make the BEST homemade Ranch dressing my friends and I have ever had.  We seriously compare all Ranch dressings to the one we had there once, totally randomly on vacation.  And we ate on the deck overlooking the Ocean on a warm October day.  It was perfect.  

(via fluffy-medved-pls-uwotm8)

Filed under South Carolina Surfside Beach

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1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

(via thewanderingcelt-deactivated201)

Filed under Southern History The South South Carolina Beaufort