The Modern Southern Gentleman...

Where tradition meets the 21st century

Posts tagged South Carolina

7 notes

lifeinmyrtlebeach:

Surfside Beach, SC

This is so random, but there’s this little place in Surfside called River City Café and they make the BEST homemade Ranch dressing my friends and I have ever had.  We seriously compare all Ranch dressings to the one we had there once, totally randomly on vacation.  And we ate on the deck overlooking the Ocean on a warm October day.  It was perfect.  

lifeinmyrtlebeach:

Surfside Beach, SC

This is so random, but there’s this little place in Surfside called River City Café and they make the BEST homemade Ranch dressing my friends and I have ever had.  We seriously compare all Ranch dressings to the one we had there once, totally randomly on vacation.  And we ate on the deck overlooking the Ocean on a warm October day.  It was perfect.  

(via preved-medved-pls)

Filed under South Carolina Surfside Beach

18,216 notes

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

(via thewanderingcelt)

Filed under Southern History The South South Carolina Beaufort

52 notes

fycharleston:

Seashell grave — “Alice”Pawleys Island, SC 


The story is a familiar one to all the locals, and her grave is well worn and often covered with offerings. It’s an age old story of a young girl who fell in love with a man who did not meet the approval of her parents. He was only the son of a merchant, and not of the plantation class to which she belonged. Her parents didn’t believe that all you need is love; for them money trumped emotion. However, she took the merchant’s son’s ring, and placed it on a necklace near her heart. She fell ill and came home from school to recover. Her brother found the ring around her neck and threw it in the river. Alice never recovered and died. It is rumored that she is spotted still searching for her ring. She is buried at All Saints Parrish in Pawley’s Island.  

fycharleston:

Seashell grave — “Alice”
Pawleys Island, SC 

The story is a familiar one to all the locals, and her grave is well worn and often covered with offerings. It’s an age old story of a young girl who fell in love with a man who did not meet the approval of her parents. He was only the son of a merchant, and not of the plantation class to which she belonged. Her parents didn’t believe that all you need is love; for them money trumped emotion. However, she took the merchant’s son’s ring, and placed it on a necklace near her heart. She fell ill and came home from school to recover. Her brother found the ring around her neck and threw it in the river. Alice never recovered and died. It is rumored that she is spotted still searching for her ring. She is buried at All Saints Parrish in Pawley’s Island.  

(Source: Flickr / jasonctaylor, via southern-gentelman)

Filed under Pawleys Island South Carolina Southern Folklore

3 notes

University of South Carolin Upstate Cans Gender & Women's Studies Department Over LGBTQ Inclusion

The sudden elimination of the center comes just a few weeks after the university hosted a symposium on gay, lesbian and transgender issues, which isn’t a coincidence. The University of South Carolina has yet to release an official statement, but it’s suspected the closing has much to do with the 2014 Bodies of Knowledge Symposium, which took place last April. 

Filed under South Carolina The South LGBTQ in the South LGBTQ University of South Carolina Bigotry

4 notes

Need for National and State Workplace Non-Discrimination Protections Grows More Obvious

This is part of a conversation recorded of the Mayor who fired the police chief: 

I would much rather have.. and I will say this to anybody’s face… somebody who drank and drank too much taking care of my child than I had somebody whose lifestyle is questionable around children.

Because that ain’t the damn way it’s supposed to be. You know…you  got people out there — I’m telling you buddy — I don’t agree with some of the lifestyles that I see portrayed and I don’t say anything because that is the way they want to live, but I am not going to let my child be around.

I’m not going to let two women stand up there and hold hands and let my child be aware of it. And I’m not going to see them do it with two men neither.”

I’m not going to do it. Because that ain’t the way the world works.

Now, all these people showering down and saying ‘Oh it’s a different lifestyle they can have it.’ Ok, fine and dandy, but I don’t have to look at it and I don’t want my child around it.

It is time for federal protection!!! 

Filed under The South LGBTQ South Carolina Homophobia Discrimination Bigotry LGBTQ in the South

2 notes

COLUMBIA, SC: USC Upstate facing more cuts over gay-themed programming | Politics | The State

southerngamerguy:

I genuinely hate SC republicans from the Upstate.  The rest of the state, not AS terrible.

We feel your pain here at the University of Tennessee after the state legislature vowed to slash finding because we dared to talk about sex.

Filed under LGBTQ LGBTQ in the South South Carolina University of South Carolina University of South Carolina Upstate College of Charleston Bigotry Sex Week University of Tennessee