The Modern Southern Gentleman

Where tradition meets the 21st century

Posts tagged Louisiana

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Cop Quits After Texting He Wishes Police Would 'Pull A Ferguson' On 'N*gger' 'Monkeys'

Warning: Racial slurs in the link.  I feel like that should be obvious based on the title, but just in case.  

This is absolutely despicable.  For a cop to behave in this way, even in their time off, renders them useless as protectors of the people and does nothing but further turn the public against them.  Not to mention the fact that Baton Rouge is home to Louisiana State University: the state’s flagship university.  All of this makes the whole situation just a bit more than unsettling.  

Filed under Baton Rouge Louisiana The South Police Brutality Racism Race Issues in the South

131 notes

mulishmusings:

This is what I see every time I walk out my front door. That pole doesn’t look like much. It doesn’t look important or like it imparts a lot of information. It doesn’t look like a monument to one of the worst disasters in U.S. history.
But that is what it is. That pole, with its green-blue glass ring and painted base are the last marker of the levee flood levels on Elysian Fields Ave. A few more blocks down and you reach the Mississippi river. These poles are spaced every few blocks up the 5 mile distance of Elysian Fields from the Mississippi river to Lake Pontchartrain. Mine is the last and lowest. When you reach the lake the green-blue glass ring and paint stretch far above your head.
These poles are an understated monument. There is no bronze plaque that explains what the symbolize. There is nothing to tell people what happened or how many people lost their lives or everything in their lives. There are no crying statues or pictures. There are only these silent poles.
The watermark poles aren’t for tourists. They are for the people of New Orleans. They stand as a simple and stark reminder of what happened to the City and her people. We don’t need explanations or pictures or crying statues. The City, her streets, and her people remember those all too well.

mulishmusings:

This is what I see every time I walk out my front door. That pole doesn’t look like much. It doesn’t look important or like it imparts a lot of information. It doesn’t look like a monument to one of the worst disasters in U.S. history.

But that is what it is. That pole, with its green-blue glass ring and painted base are the last marker of the levee flood levels on Elysian Fields Ave. A few more blocks down and you reach the Mississippi river. These poles are spaced every few blocks up the 5 mile distance of Elysian Fields from the Mississippi river to Lake Pontchartrain. Mine is the last and lowest. When you reach the lake the green-blue glass ring and paint stretch far above your head.

These poles are an understated monument. There is no bronze plaque that explains what the symbolize. There is nothing to tell people what happened or how many people lost their lives or everything in their lives. There are no crying statues or pictures. There are only these silent poles.

The watermark poles aren’t for tourists. They are for the people of New Orleans. They stand as a simple and stark reminder of what happened to the City and her people. We don’t need explanations or pictures or crying statues. The City, her streets, and her people remember those all too well.

(via opalborn)

Filed under New Orleans Louisiana Hurricane Katrina

145 notes

opalborn:

themodernsoutherngentleman:

opalborn:

volsathletics:

Best college football stadium ever.

excuse you I have a few Death Valley related things to say to you

Haha! :) Gotta love that Southern football rivalry!  No shade to Mizzou, but I really wish Clemson had joined the SEC instead.  Not that Mizzou isn’t good, but they clearly aren’t in the Southeast.  

oh honey no, we have to talk — I’m an LSU grad. Clemson is a big ole pile of copycats — tigers and Death Valley? Bless their hearts. Those are ours. Death Valley is the Fighting Tigers and 102,000 of your closest friends on Saturday night. And when I talk about college football, I care solely about the SEC :P

My sincerest apologies! That was my first instinct, but I 2nd guessed myself and went with Clemson - not sure why they call their stadium that as well.  I shoulda known my sheer student body size! Haha.  

opalborn:

themodernsoutherngentleman:

opalborn:

volsathletics:

Best college football stadium ever.

excuse you I have a few Death Valley related things to say to you

Haha! :) Gotta love that Southern football rivalry!  No shade to Mizzou, but I really wish Clemson had joined the SEC instead.  Not that Mizzou isn’t good, but they clearly aren’t in the Southeast.  

oh honey no, we have to talk — I’m an LSU grad. Clemson is a big ole pile of copycats — tigers and Death Valley? Bless their hearts. Those are ours. Death Valley is the Fighting Tigers and 102,000 of your closest friends on Saturday night. And when I talk about college football, I care solely about the SEC :P

My sincerest apologies! That was my first instinct, but I 2nd guessed myself and went with Clemson - not sure why they call their stadium that as well.  I shoulda known my sheer student body size! Haha.  

Filed under LSU Louisiana State University Baton Rouge Death Valley Louisiana SEC Football Southern Football

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Memphis is a city I love so much and a city that will always be “home” for me, no matter where I get my mail.  It is a part of me and I’m a part of it.  I wouldn’t be who I am today without this city and I’m reminded of that every day…and forever thankful. 

This is part 6 of a so far 6 part series from WREG-TV in Memphis, focusing on overcoming many of the obstacles that Memphis faces and how other Southern cities have tackled similar issues.  I’ll be linking the other parts in each post.  

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Filed under Memphis Nashville Birmingham New Orleans The South Tennessee Alabama Louisiana

7,777 notes

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public 
BGLH writes:
“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.
“WOW. Really?” I replied.
I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.
With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.
Read more here.

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public

BGLH writes:

“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.

“WOW. Really?” I replied.

I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.

With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.

Read more here.

(via maghrabiyya)

Filed under The South Racism Louisiana Antebellum South

10 notes

dark-vowelled:

Things That Cause People To Look At Me Oddly At Meals (aka I Swear I’ve Lived Here My Whole Life Really):
—I can’t stand tea. Sweetened or unsweetened, flavored, plain, whatever, iced tea and I have no business together. (I don’t like that hot stuff people apparently only drink from teacups while wearing sweaters either.)
—I don’t like spicy foods. Actually, I like only the barest hint of fire/pepper/spiciness, but because I live in South Louisiana, that’s a literally impossible thing to get anyone to understand, so “no spicy” is easier. This means, unfortunately, that
—I don’t eat crawfish at crawfish boils. I like crawfish just fine in crawfish pasta, crawfish bread, crawfish dressing, everything except GIANT VAT OF ALL THE SPICES EVER TOPPED WITH FIRE. I can’t eat anything that comes out of the fire vat, sorry. (Yes, that includes the potatoes. The potatoes are hotter than the crawfish. And let’s not even talk about the mushrooms.)
—I don’t drink Coke, Dr. Pepper, or Pepsi. Sole redeeming preference here is that I love root beer.
—I’m not a big fan of okra. It’s a texture thing, I think, because I can eat fried okra, I just prefer not to. (You would not believe how old I was when I found out okra was a plant that some people just ate. Without frying!)
—I kinda despise grits. It’s definitely a texture thing. I’ll take oatmeal if I require a mushy hot breakfast, thanks.
—I’m not wild about garlic, and I definitely don’t ever want to actually bite into a chunk of it in my food. Again, South Louisiana. This becomes a problem sometimes.

The end result is that I look really picky if I’m at big public meals, because I don’t eat the vast majority of what’s on the table. I’m not that picky; it’s just that the things I don’t like eating are 80% of the food served here. And then I feel bad. Saving graces, though? I can and will happily eat any amount of macaroni and cheese anyone ever puts in front of me. Also, fruit. Like, all of it. Give it to me. Also also, delicious bread. Om nom nom.

OMG, how have you survived down here!!! I have the opposite problem, lol.  While Memphis food isn’t spicy like Southern Louisiana, it’s still pretty spicy a lot of the time.  Having lived in Appalachia for 10 years now (I still can’t believe it’s been that long), I crave spice SO MUCH.  Even when getting Asian food around here, when I ask for spicy, I ask for it made like the cook would eat it.  People look at me like I’m crazy (until I become a regular) and then come check on me every 2 minutes until they realize I really am ok, lol,  

Filed under Southern Food Appalachia Louisiana New Orleans Memphis Tennessee Knoxville