The Modern Southern Gentleman...

Where tradition meets the 21st century

Posts tagged Louisiana

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Louisiana House votes 27-67 to keep unconstitutional anti-sodomy law on the books

How is this even an issue, Louisiana?  Literally, the ruling is in.  Your law is unconstitutional.  Period.  I love you Louisiana.  Get it together! 

Filed under Louisiana LGBTQ The South LGBTQ In the South

1,792 notes

abandonedography:

In the realm of reality, Carcosa is better known as Fort Macomb, a 19th-century brick fortress that once guarded the waters of Chef Menteur Pass in New Orleans. Fort Macomb, originally known as Fort Chef Menteur, then Fort Wood, was completed in 1822. (The Americans had just fended off the British in the Battle of New Orleans and figured a few extra forts around the place couldn’t hurt.)

Fort Macomb saw some action during the Civil War — Confederate soldiers camped there until the Union captured New Orleans and took the fort for themselves. In 1871, Fort Macomb was decommissioned and has sat idle ever since. Crumbling, overgrown, and battered by Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Gustav, it is too hazardous for the public to visit. But just hazardous enough for Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson.

The Real Location of True Detective’s Carcosa, Fort Mccomb

Filed under New Orleans Louisiana The South Fort Macomb Urban Decay Urban Decadence Natural Reclamation Abandoned Building Abandoned Buildings

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Shreveport is doin its part to show that we aren’t all bigots dow South.  It’s so great to have a positive LGBTQ story to report.  I couldn’t get the embed code to this, so I just ripped the video.  Here’s a link to the written story and here’s a link to the local KMSS station that covered this story

Filed under Shreveport Louisiana The South LGBTQ Trans* Trans Transgender Anti-Discrimination

225 notes

socialismartnature:

On this day in 1887, more than 10,000 sugar cane laborers went on strike on plantations across Louisiana. The mostly black workers (including nearly 1,000 whites), organized with the Knights of Labor, demanded wage increases of $1.25 a day in biweekly payments of currency rather than company’s script for their back-breaking labor. They planned the strike to coincide with the beginning of the critical “grinding” period - which threatened the entire year’s harvest. Three weeks into the strike, state Judge Taylor Beattie declared martial law, and organized a white vigilante mob which ruthlessly gunned down strikers and their families in what came to be known as the Thibodaux Massacre. One black newspaper described the scene, ” ‘Six killed and five wounded’ is what the daily papers here say, but from an eye witness to the whole transaction we learn that no less than thirty-five Negroes were killed outright. Lame men and blind women shot; children and hoary-headed grandsires ruthlessly swept down! The Negroes offered no resistance; they could not, as the killing was unexpected. Those of them not killed took to the woods.”

socialismartnature:

On this day in 1887, more than 10,000 sugar cane laborers went on strike on plantations across Louisiana. The mostly black workers (including nearly 1,000 whites), organized with the Knights of Labor, demanded wage increases of $1.25 a day in biweekly payments of currency rather than company’s script for their back-breaking labor. They planned the strike to coincide with the beginning of the critical “grinding” period - which threatened the entire year’s harvest.

Three weeks into the strike, state Judge Taylor Beattie declared martial law, and organized a white vigilante mob which ruthlessly gunned down strikers and their families in what came to be known as the Thibodaux Massacre. One black newspaper described the scene,

” ‘Six killed and five wounded’ is what the daily papers here say, but from an eye witness to the whole transaction we learn that no less than thirty-five Negroes were killed outright. Lame men and blind women shot; children and hoary-headed grandsires ruthlessly swept down! The Negroes offered no resistance; they could not, as the killing was unexpected. Those of them not killed took to the woods.”

(via maghrabiyya)

Filed under The South Louisiana Slavery

39 notes

thetangential:

Greenville Cypress Preserve, Greenville, Mississippi. This compact but serene nonprofit preserve provides a (free) opportunity to walk along boardwalks lacing one of the South’s iconic cypress groves. There’s an almost prehistoric feel to the duckweed-skinned ponds in which the thickly-ridged trees use knee-like roots to steady themselves. The preserve’s proprietors are not above maintaining a dense patch of bamboo, which is locally regarded as an invasive species, but—like the even more destructive kudzu—is pretty damn cool-looking.
Ten Awesome Places I Visited on My Southern U.S. Road Trip That You Should Visit Too

Seriously, follow the link.  It’s some truly cool stuff! 

thetangential:

Greenville Cypress Preserve, Greenville, Mississippi. This compact but serene nonprofit preserve provides a (free) opportunity to walk along boardwalks lacing one of the South’s iconic cypress groves. There’s an almost prehistoric feel to the duckweed-skinned ponds in which the thickly-ridged trees use knee-like roots to steady themselves. The preserve’s proprietors are not above maintaining a dense patch of bamboo, which is locally regarded as an invasive species, but—like the even more destructive kudzu—is pretty damn cool-looking.

Ten Awesome Places I Visited on My Southern U.S. Road Trip That You Should Visit Too

Seriously, follow the link.  It’s some truly cool stuff! 

(via mississippi-missy)

Filed under The South Mississippi Tennessee Memphis Oxford Greenville Pigeon Forge The Peabody Hotel The Peabody Louisiana New Orleans

4,023 notes

specialnights:

Louisiana, 1976.
Still exists today.

I’ve been seeing a lot of old photos lately, many of which are appropriate here, and I think it’s incredibly important to remember our history because, like the above comment says, it allows you to spot it a mile away when you see it today.  
I did remove some of the comments here, but you can see them on my personal blog if you’d like. 

specialnights:

Louisiana, 1976.

Still exists today.

I’ve been seeing a lot of old photos lately, many of which are appropriate here, and I think it’s incredibly important to remember our history because, like the above comment says, it allows you to spot it a mile away when you see it today.  

I did remove some of the comments here, but you can see them on my personal blog if you’d like. 

(via ananimal)

Filed under Racism The South Louisiana

7 notes

The South Seems to be Going Crazy Right Now

And I’ve been a little overwhelmed by life in general, so I’ve kinda just had to sit back with my jaw hanging open.  From Texas and North Carolina pretty well trying to ban abortion (something even Mississippi couldn’t accomplish), Rick Perry vetoing a bill that passed the Texas House of Representatives unanimously that would have required the state to buy US made goods when they were comparable in price and quality to foreign-made goods, and some crazy Louisianans trying to ban the flying of Gay Pride flags, the South is aflame with bigotry, oppression, and just plain stupidity much more visibly and widespread than the norm.  

But Tennessee just couldn’t stay out of it.  Gotta throw our name in the crazy hat, too. Thankfully, it’s not a politician this time, just a former lawyer.  He’s suing Apple for, get this, being able to access and view porn on his Apple devices.  You can’t make this stuff up, lol.  All because of a typo when he tried to go fo Facebook.com and ended up at Fuckbook.com.  He says it led to an “unwanted sex addiction.”  So it’s Apple’s fault that you can’t type or keep it in your pants?  I just don’t get how a former lawyer thinks this is a legitimate claim.  

Honestly, I think it’s a publicity stunt.  When I googled the guy, assuming he was a politician I’d never heard of, a Facebook page comes up that appears to be a “band page” with all of 77 “Likes” at the time of this writing. 

Filed under The South Texas North Carolina Louisiana Tennessee Reproductive Rights LGBTQ Apple Stupid People

10 notes

I recently made a trip back home to Memphis, with pit stops in Sikeston, MO to see my maternal grandparents and Potts Camp, MS to visit my daddy’s side of the family.  When I travel, I think a lot about the South, what it was, what it is, where it’s headed.  But it seems like there there isn’t always a consensus about what is Southern and what isn’t.  My grandparents in Sikeston, for example, have a few Southern tendencies, but don’t really consider themselves Southern, but both of their children do/did.  
Momma moved to Memphis in 1976 to attend nursing school and most definitely has always considered herself a Southern woman.  Her brother stayed in the Bootheel, but he and his kids all consider themselves Southern.  And my mother and I have always accepted that as fact.  After all, Southeast MO is a cultural transition area where the South meets the Midwest.  That part of the sate often even pronounces their homeland as “Missourah” instead of the traditional “Missouree,” definitely a Southern speech pattern. 
My grandparents tell me almost every time I see them that I “don’t sound like [I’m] from Memphis.”  It used to somewhat offend me, but I’ve realized why they think this way: I speak quickly.  The idea that all Southerners speak slowly is not only antiquated, it’s very inaccurate.  Sure, there are plenty of Southerners that still speak like that, but it’s not really the norm anymore.  So many of us are from large cities and speaking slowly just doesn’t generally cut it there.  Doesn’t mean we’ve lost our accent or manners, just that we have just as much to say, but less time to do so.  
But Southern culture isn’t one giant homogenous thing.  We share common elements, the fact that we drawl our words, but even the way we do that varies.  Carolina Lowcountry isn’t West Tennessee cotton culture.  So, I decided to make this map.  I know that even this is somewhat of a generalization, but feel like it’s pretty accurate.  I’m always open to suggestions if anyone has them.  And obviously these different areas aren’t exclusive; cultures bleed and blend.  Southern Appalachia is most definitely Southern, but it’s different than central Georgia’s culture. Also, the Deep South is generally listed as MS, AL, and GA. But Southeast AR, North LA and SC definitely constitute Deep South as well.  I’ve included the very Southwest corner of TN, namely Memphis and up to around the Covington, TN area.  The reason for this is that we are part of the Mississippi River Delta and Delta culture is most definitely Deep South. 
Do note “New South” doesn’t strictly denote the idea that these areas haven’t always been considered the South, rather that they are now the outermost border of what is thought of as the South by most people today.
Our culture constantly grows, shifts, and evolves, yet maintains our Southern charms and sensibilities.  The South is our home and here’s to keeping it that way! 

I recently made a trip back home to Memphis, with pit stops in Sikeston, MO to see my maternal grandparents and Potts Camp, MS to visit my daddy’s side of the family.  When I travel, I think a lot about the South, what it was, what it is, where it’s headed.  But it seems like there there isn’t always a consensus about what is Southern and what isn’t.  My grandparents in Sikeston, for example, have a few Southern tendencies, but don’t really consider themselves Southern, but both of their children do/did.  

Momma moved to Memphis in 1976 to attend nursing school and most definitely has always considered herself a Southern woman.  Her brother stayed in the Bootheel, but he and his kids all consider themselves Southern.  And my mother and I have always accepted that as fact.  After all, Southeast MO is a cultural transition area where the South meets the Midwest.  That part of the sate often even pronounces their homeland as “Missourah” instead of the traditional “Missouree,” definitely a Southern speech pattern. 

My grandparents tell me almost every time I see them that I “don’t sound like [I’m] from Memphis.”  It used to somewhat offend me, but I’ve realized why they think this way: I speak quickly.  The idea that all Southerners speak slowly is not only antiquated, it’s very inaccurate.  Sure, there are plenty of Southerners that still speak like that, but it’s not really the norm anymore.  So many of us are from large cities and speaking slowly just doesn’t generally cut it there.  Doesn’t mean we’ve lost our accent or manners, just that we have just as much to say, but less time to do so.  

But Southern culture isn’t one giant homogenous thing.  We share common elements, the fact that we drawl our words, but even the way we do that varies.  Carolina Lowcountry isn’t West Tennessee cotton culture.  So, I decided to make this map.  I know that even this is somewhat of a generalization, but feel like it’s pretty accurate.  I’m always open to suggestions if anyone has them.  And obviously these different areas aren’t exclusive; cultures bleed and blend.  Southern Appalachia is most definitely Southern, but it’s different than central Georgia’s culture. Also, the Deep South is generally listed as MS, AL, and GA. But Southeast AR, North LA and SC definitely constitute Deep South as well.  I’ve included the very Southwest corner of TN, namely Memphis and up to around the Covington, TN area.  The reason for this is that we are part of the Mississippi River Delta and Delta culture is most definitely Deep South. 

Do note “New South” doesn’t strictly denote the idea that these areas haven’t always been considered the South, rather that they are now the outermost border of what is thought of as the South by most people today.

Our culture constantly grows, shifts, and evolves, yet maintains our Southern charms and sensibilities.  The South is our home and here’s to keeping it that way! 

Filed under Memphis Tennessee The South Potts Camp Mississippi Sikeston Missouri Alabama Georgia South Carolina North Carolina Virginia Maryland Deleware West Virginia Kentucky Arkansas Texas Louisiana Florida Deep South Map Maps

2 notes

Self Evident Truths is a project I heard about a long time ago and, honestly, figured would fizzle out.  It didn’t.  I learned today that they are actually headed out on a tour of the South! 

NYC based photographer, iO Tillet Wright, began this project in 2010, photographing a few hundred people in NYC.  But the project has grown! And, as Southerners, our faces need to be seen and our voices heard.  So often, we are left out of the conversation on LGBTQ rights all together.  People assume we grow up and move away; we try to escape the South.  We need to show them that we are here and happy! After all, if we all left, this place would never change.  I encourage everyone that has the possibility to do so to turn out and have your photo taken.  

Here is a list of the cities they will be in and when: 

Oklahoma City, OK February 24 & 25

Dallas, TX
February 26

Little Rock, AR
February 27

Jackson, MS
February 28

New Orleans, LA
March 1 & 2

Mobile, LA
March 3

Birmingham, AL
March 4

Atlanta, GA
March 6 & 7

Athens, GA
March 8

Asheville, NC
March 9

Knoxville, TN
March 11 & 12

Filed under LGBTQ LGBT Gay The South Knoxville Tennessee Atlanta Athens Georgia Dallas Texas Jackson Mississippi New Orleans NOLA Louisiana Mobile Birmingham Alabama Asheville North Carolina Oklahoma Oklahoma City OKC